#231 Rorion Gracie, Part 2

by Caleb on January 9, 2011

Rorion Gracie Rener Brazilian jiu-jitsu
From left to right: Renon, Rorion, Roran, and Rener Gracie. Click photo to enlarge.

Happy 2011, Family!

The FightWorks Podcast returns with the second half of our interview with Rorion Gracie. (For part one, go here!)

For those who just started Brazilian jiu-jitsu yesterday and don’t know who Rorion is, well it’s probably safe to say that you would not be training jiu-jitsu if Rorion had not come to the United States and started the UFC where his younger brother Royce demonstrated the effectiveness of jiu-jitsu to the world. That is where jiu-jitsu’s popularity began outside Brazil, and a subsequent chain of events lead you to wanting to learn how to do jiu-jitsu techniques.

So here we are in a new year. You’re training BJJ and there are 12 months of being fit, seeing your BJJ friends, learning new moves, and maybe even a few bumps and bruises along the way. Life is really good!

[iTunes] Subscribe to the Podcast directly in iTunes (recommended)
[mp3] Download the show

{ 7 comments… read them below or add one }

Franck January 9, 2011 at 1:46 pm

Actually there are nutritionists researches that are relevant to the Gracie diet concept, I bought a book 4 years ago call the PH Miracle , same concept losts of recipes , and scientifically proven.
the link : http://www.phmiracleliving.com/
Great show Caleb , Thank you so much for your daring questions.

Mike January 10, 2011 at 3:45 pm

I loved when he talked about the world champion in jiu-jitsu should be able to enter into a no hold barred fight and should win.

Two words came to mind….

Roger Gracie.

I smiled because of the truth of Rorion’s statement

John January 10, 2011 at 4:00 pm

I was really looking forward to these interviews, but found them to be quite lacking. Why rehash stuff we already know like why Rorion chose Royce? Why not ask about the terse relationship between the family? Rorion sued his cousin Carley for trademark infringement, isn’t that more interesting?

Renzo was on the show recently talking about the family; why not ask about that? Why the snarky questioning of Rorion’s online training program?

Big let down, guys.

Franck January 10, 2011 at 11:42 pm

since it is their family business i think we should stay out of it ….

Rahz January 11, 2011 at 7:53 am

Question: Does Master Rorion believe that you can gauge a soccerplayer’s soccerskills by the way he or she dribbles the ball?

I my mind being able to dribble the ball, does not make you able to play soccer. I guess just like showing off different jiu-jitsu techniques does not reflect your ability to use jiu-jitsu against a real life opponent.

What do you think?

rolo February 11, 2011 at 4:12 am

I like what Rorion said in regards to the self defense in gjj/bjj. In order to make rank under myself or the head instructor where I teach you have to know the self defense for blue belt, purple belt, etc… we have sport bjj guys come and do seminars here often and I love to train open spider guard myself…but we make sure the students understand that the academy is a controlled environment and not the street…as such the self defense techniques are given utmost importance in the academy.

INDY TURBO BOOST April 1, 2011 at 1:15 am

The Gracies, as well as others from third world countries, had to grow up in a violent environment. EXPERIENCE is the best teacher; practice makes perfect.
Forged in the mayhem of a fighting culture, they tend to come out on top. (No pun intended) Many of the strikers have not the experience of real life, street combat.
Secondly, their striking regiment / discipline has waned over the decades. I don’t see any strikers who exude “lightning quick” delivery, devastating impact, nor are they accurate. Their timing / distance dynamic …. there is no timing / distance strategies in their striking styles. From what I’ve seen, I give it to the Gracie Grapplers. Even without formal training, anyone who survived and grew up in a hostile environment will be the superior fighter. I’d venture to say, that the average Brazilian , without martial arts training, will most likely take a black belt out in a real fight, who grew up in a sheltered, isolated environment.
Every striker should incorporate in their martial arts regiment, ground fighting skills, since 95% of all fights end up on the ground, that only makes sense to learn both styles.

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